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Боб Синклер, Bob Sinclar: интервью, 2006

With back-to-back Winter Music Conference smash records "Love Generation" and "World Hold On," French house maestro Bob Sinclar has launched the incredible album Western Dreams. Touring the world playing to massive crowds, Bob explores new inspirations and produces new music just about every day. With the ragga-flavored and C&C Music Factory-sampling "Rock This Party," it's obvious that you can find inspiration for great dance music just about anywhere.

DJ Ron Slomowicz: How has the tour been this year?

Bob Sinclar: Really good and really exhausting. It was really amazing because it's following two hit singles in a row, "Love Generation" and "World Hold On" (which went top 10 in the UK, top three in France and number one in the album charts all around Europe). When you have a big tune you have a lot of requests for all around Europe to play in the bigger clubs, and you get a very nice response from the audience.

RS: You also had the FIFA World Cup song "Love Generation." Did you get a big response from that as well with the soccer players?

Bob Sinclar: We synchronized Love Generation with the mascot, Goleo. It was nice to be introduced to the German market which is really, really commercial. It was very nice support.

RS: This new single "Rock This Party" sounds completely different than the first two singles. What was the inspiration for it?

Bob Sinclar: I started on the DJ scene in 1988 and started with hip-hop and dance and, of course, C&C Music Factory was really huge because they used to mix house, hip-hop, and all types of influences in their music. I've had in my head for two or three years this guitar loop and this sample. So I did it, but it was hard for me to find a way to reintroduce the loop with a nice vibe.

RS: It's also very upbeat. The last two singles were serious and issue-oriented and its a nice change for something so light, fluffy, and energetic.

Bob Sinclar: Yes, it's true. The tempo is more a factor than in the beginning of the 90s and the idea was to add some ragga and do a crossover with the dance DJs and hip-hop DJs. Guys like Sean Paul and a lot of reggae and dancehall toasters use the coolie riddim. So it was easier for me to adapt this new rhythm with the guitar loop.

RS: I noticed the variety of styles on Western Dreams, your current album. When you were working on the album, did you intentionally want to put a variety of sounds on it?

Bob Sinclar: I want my music to reach a lot of people and I like to do beautiful songs. At the beginning of last year I was looking for something new, and I met Gary Pine from the Wailers. We met in New York at Studio One and I had these three chords of guitar of Love Generation, and from that point we started to make a beautiful song. I also worked with Duane Harden, who did "You Don't Know Me" with Armand Van Helden. He's a great singer and a great writer who helped to write the lyrics on the album.

RS: How do balance DJing and production?

Bob Sinclar: It's really hard, because my heart is in the studio and I like to make music. I have a little room and I work on my laptop. I like to do that every day. It's like my blood and I like to find new ideas, new sounds, new peaks, and a bigger sound for Miami and for the summer next year. It's also very exciting to play the track when you've finished producing it. It's hard because you have to travel a lot, but it's a beautiful job. I like it.

RS: On your laptop, what software are you working with?

Bob Sinclar: I'm working with Digital Performer.

RS: You just mentioned Miami and it seems like you've had the big Winter Music Conference record for two years in a row. Is that something you planned for?

Bob Sinclar: Ah, you can't plan this kind of thing. In 2005, I just finished "Love Generation" two days before Miami and it was a good opportunity for me to test the track. I always expected it to be the track of Ibiza and the summer. So it was a good opportunity for me to test the track in Miami because all the DJs are there and I really like the be support of DJs. I go first to be supported by all the big DJs around the world, and the world is completely different. So I said why not introduce this 'three chords of guitar during eight minutes with this Jamaican vibe on it' record, and the hook was really catchy but at the same time I think the song is beautiful. So Miami, it's still a good window and a good exposure for me because all the DJs are there.

RS: I've always wanted to ask you, your record label is called Yellow. Why the color yellow?

Bob Sinclar: I don't know. I had a partner who left three years ago and his name was DJ Yellow. So you know it's going to happen, you have to find a good name. Maybe it would be good to be blue but it was really already taken with BlueNote. That was the sound of a blue note, so I'd say why not do that with a yellow note.

RS: When you're DJing out right, in addition to your original stuff, what other kinds of music do you play? What other artists and producers?

Bob Sinclar: I like all types of music. I like Chicago producers like Ron Carroll and Paul Johnson and also Masters at Work, Armand Van Helden, Erick Morillo, and Roger Sanchez from the US. I also like a electro from Sweden and good stuff from France, like my friend Martin Solveig and his guitar. So I take the best from everywhere and of course play most of my tracks because the people that come now expect it and I think it would be too much for a DJ to just play records.

RS: Do you ever get requests for Gym Tonic?

Bob Sinclar: Yes, every time. Every time I have a request I play it of course, it's a very catchy track.

RS: I know it's going back in time, but where did the idea for Gym Tonic come from?

Bob Sinclar: I was in the studio with Thomas Bangalter from Daft Punk and I had just finished a mix for Stardust "Music Sounds Better With You." Tom said he had this idea for a track with me with a big disco loops and this acapella he had – the Jane Fonda. We did it as a joke and it was very catchy. We decided to have fun with it and see what happened.

RS: When it was released in the UK, it came out as Spacedust. Were you both behind Spacedust?

Bob Sinclar: No. We didn't really want to release it as a single because Thomas was involved with it and he was in other projects. We got it released on the vinyl album. It went number one in the UK club charts because some people called Spacedust released it as a cover version. What can we do? The English people, they can do that.

RS: One thing I like about your album are these great videos you're doing. How involved are you with the making of the videos?

Bob Sinclar: I have all the ideas at the beginning. When I did Love Generation, it was really about peace and love and we did a nice atmosphere, really 70s. I wanted to have these children have a roller blade race through San Francisco, but it was too dangerous. My friend Denise Tibo, who directed the videos, shot it in fifteen days around the US. It's hard because I'm not a singer so I don't really act as an artist. In Europe I have a bigger name so it's easier for me to be an artist, but I know in the US it's different. It was cool to have the boy be in three different videos playing on one story line.

RS: The "Rock This Party" video, is that just your ultimate house party that you always wanted growing up?

Bob Sinclar: I wanted at first to do a very American hip-hop video with bikinis and all the girls and everything, but at the end I said no, we have to keep the little boy and we have to do this beautiful house party. When you are a kid you always want to break the rules in your house because everything is forbidden. It was a joke for the children, just to live that dream. I think, especially in Europe, the children don't dream enough now, they don't dream anymore.

RS: Is there anything you'd like to say to all your fans out there?

Bob Sinclar: I'm really happy to come back to see everyone on tour. Thank you for supporting the music and for liking my style and my music. I'm here, I'm here for you

From DJ Ron Slomowicz, former About.com Guide dancemusic.about.com

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